Health & Beauty News

Real Men Wear Pink

Real Men Wear Pink

August 07, 2018 Liquid error (sections/blog-template.liquid line 150): Could not find asset snippets/include-read-time.liquid

Every day, the American Cancer Society is saving more lives from breast cancer than ever before. They're helping people take steps to reduce their risk of breast cancer or find it early, when it's easier to treat. They provide free information and services when and where people need it.
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Mistletoe Clinical Trial - Now Open

Mistletoe Clinical Trial - Now Open

April 12, 2017 Liquid error (sections/blog-template.liquid line 150): Could not find asset snippets/include-read-time.liquid

Mistletoe treatment for cancer is used widely in Germany and Switzerland, but in the United States, every potential treatment must be studied in a series of steps, call phases. Each phase is designed to answer a separate research question. The Mistletoe clinical trial at Johns Hopkins will be a Phase 1 trial, in which researchers will be testing the drug on a small group of participants to evaluate safety, determine a safe dose, and identify side effects. This is the first step of many research steps before mistletoe can be considered for conventional use in cancer treatment.
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FDA Update on Rare Breast Implant-Associated Type of Lymphoma

FDA Update on Rare Breast Implant-Associated Type of Lymphoma

April 12, 2017 Liquid error (sections/blog-template.liquid line 150): Could not find asset snippets/include-read-time.liquid

The FDA notes that most data suggest that BIA-ALCL occurs more often after implantation of breast implants with textured surfaces rather than those with smooth surfaces.As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports (MDRs) of BIA-ALCL, including 9 deaths. Of the 231 reports that included information on the implant surface, 203 concerned textured implants and 28, smooth implants.
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Children exposed to CT scans face increased risk of developing cancer

Children exposed to CT scans face increased risk of developing cancer

April 04, 2017 Liquid error (sections/blog-template.liquid line 150): Could not find asset snippets/include-read-time.liquid

CT scans are used by doctors to get to the core of a problem by creating a 3D image of the most inaccessible nooks of the body.But the beams of ionising radiation can cause cellular damage.A fresh analysis of 2013 research is being presented by researchers from the University of Melbourne at the World Congress of Public Health in Melbourne said the radiation risk was much greater than previously acknowledged.

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